Skip to main content

tv   Victoria Derbyshire  BBC News  March 10, 2017 9:00am-11:01am GMT

9:00 am
hello. it's friday. it's 9am. welcome to the programme. a major shake—up of broadband services for thousands of customers as bt says it will legally separate from openreach. we'll find out what the decision could mean for you. no vote on tax rises for self—employed workers until the autumn. labour calls it a partial u—turn. theresa may says the changes will reform the national insurance system and make it "fairer and simpler". people will be able to look at government paper when we produce it and takea government paper when we produce it and take a judgement in the round and take a judgement in the round and of course, the chancellor will be speaking as will his ministers to mps, business people and others to listen to the concerns. also this morning, design and technology, music, german — just some of the subjects being cut at gcse and a—level by headteachers who say they're being forced to scale back because of funding cuts. we'll have the details. and are we living in a golden age of satire? we'll talk to writers and performers who say politics in 2017 is providing more material
9:01 am
than they ever thought possible. what's that doing in here? that's a plate of mashed potato. we are lucky that trump will provide most of the jokes for the foreseeable future. hello and welcome to the programme. we're live until 11am. if you're a pupil or teacher in a school where subjects are being cut, do get in touch with us. have you studied or taught one of the less popular subjects like german? does it matter if the fewer people get to take it in the future? do get in touch on all the stories we're talking about this morning — use #victoria live and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. it's been announced that british telecom and its openreach
9:02 am
service, which runs the uk's broadband infrastructure, are to be legally separated. telecoms regulator, ofcom, says openreach will become a distinct company with its own staff, management and strategy. ofcom had been pushing for the move following complaints about poor levels of service and had threatened to force bt to legally separate openreach. rory cellan—jones is our technology correspondent. good morning. so, tell us more about why it is happening then. well, this has been a long running battle. critics says that bt‘s openreach division which is responsible for the broadband infrastructure across the broadband infrastructure across the uk, a vital bit of infrastructure for all of us has not been doing a good job. rivals like sky and talktalk say they depend on it and they can't rely on it and it is biassed towards bt rather than them when it is supposed to be impartial. that its engineers don't
9:03 am
turn up on time and then customers have been complaining that the roll out of fibre broadband services has been too slow. so, ofcom has been looking at this for a while. there was a nuclear option where bt were forced to sell it off completely. it would become a separate company. i think they concluded that would just ta ke think they concluded that would just take a long time. bt would have challenged it in the courts. it could have taken ten years to complete. so this is the sub—nuclear option in a way. so it is a separate division. it is supposed to be run separately and they are supposed to be arm's length from the rest of bt and that's supposed to end up with a better service. why would it end up with a better service? why does separating them make those things that have been going wrong right? well, that's the $64,000 question. the theory is without having to look over their shoulder, there has been accusations which bt denied that money they earn in 0penreach is
9:04 am
spent on things like football rights. we have seen bt spend a fortune this week on renewing its champions league football rights. this will make it clear that that can't happen. it should, it is built into the process now that they are impartial so that they don't supply better services to bt when it is talking about customers, to sky or talktalk or to any of the other people who are going to use that service. the question then is where would that money go? it could, i guess, go in terms of cuts to costs to customers or customer improvements. are they going to be forced to do one or the other? they are going to have the same amount of money. it's more about the strategy and more about the attitude and the culture of the company. there has been a feeling that it has got too much of the legacy culture of what was many years ago, of course, a state run monopoly. some of those habits have stayed with it and it will be leaner, quicker and more focussed. it has got one job,
9:05 am
rolling out broadband across britain and providing britain with the kind of telecoms infrastructure it needs. it will be responsible for that. it shouldn't be worrying about whether it is delivering enough profits to the bt group. it shouldn't in theory have that on its plate too. 0k, we will see happens, rory thank you very much. does that bother you? get in touch if you have got any thoughts on that one. annita mcveigh is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. labour has accused the government of being in "disarray" after the prime minister said controversial tax rises for self—employed workers would not be put into legislation until the autumn. theresa may said the changes to national insurance, announced in the budget, were necessary and fair but said the chancellor would listen to concerns before mps voted on the measures later this year. 0ur political correspondent alex forsyth reports from westminster. theresa may defended the plans to increase national insurance contributions for some self—employed workers. she said the measures would ensure the tax system was fair, narrowing the gap between what employed
9:06 am
and self—employed people paid. the shift towards self—employment is eroding the tax base. it is making it harder to afford the public services on which ordinary working families depend. this goes some way towards fixing that. despite being announced in this week's budget, mps will not vote on the changes until the autumn as separate legislation is required. critics accused the prime minister of a deliberate delay so the government could soften the proposals and stave off a potential rebellion from tory backbenchers who have expressed opposition. but mrs may stood firm saying the tax rise was necessary in light of the country's changing workforce and the timing would allow mps to consider the measures in the round. a paper detailing the full effect of the national insurance changes will be published in the summer followed by the results of a review into wider employment practices. let's talk about this with iann
9:07 am
watson, labour sense an opportunity to go on the attack here. is labour getting much traction with this? well, i think in the end this will come down to the attitudes of the conservative backbenchers. labour are slow off the mark in criticising this on budget day, but since then the shadow chancellor, john mcdonnell, has called for this to be withdrawn and the liberal democrats as well. and certainly, where i think labour can make an impact is talking to some of the conservative potential rebels on this to see what pressure can be put on the chancellor. but i think the timing, as alex was saying, is crucial because it allows theresa may to do two things. firstly, publish the review into working practises which is likely to give, if you like, self—employed people more value for money from their tax rise, they
9:08 am
might be getting maternity or paternity rights. if that isn't enough to buy off some of these rebels on her own side then there is, of course, uniquely this year two budgets so the chancellor could do something there and i have been speaking to some people who are displeased about this on the conservative benches and one of them said very pleased to see attempts to soften the blow by perhaps looking at these new rights and benefits that people could get, but ultimately what they wanted to see was a delay in implementing the measure. so telling people they wouldn't have to pay the extra by 2019. whether the chancellor will be prepared to do that is another matter because the more concessions he makes, of course, the less money that comes to the treasury. iani, thank you very much. schools in england are being forced to cut gcse and a—level courses in an effort to balance the books, according to a head teachers' union. the association of school
9:09 am
and college leaders has warned budget pressures are driving up class sizes and causing them to cancel activities such as social clubs and school trips. 0ur education correspondent gillian hargreaves reports. peter woodman at the weald school might be a head teacher but he still likes to work at the chalk face, partly because he enjoys it but partly because it saves money for the school. the only reason we can survive is we are carrying forward money from last year. and if the government stick to their pledges over the next five years, with the cash flow and budgets, we will be making cuts to something like 70,000 every year, year on year. peter is one of dozens of heads in south—east england who wrote to parents yesterday informing them of the impact of cuts. in a poll of more than 1,000 members of the ascl union almost three quarters said they had to make cuts to gcse or vocational courses in the past 12 months. the most common subjects to have been removed were design and technology, performing arts, music and german. parents also have their concerns. i think really important parts
9:10 am
of education will be cut. class sizes will increase and i think they are probably already at capacity, teachers' jobs will become even harder. i think it's a real concern. i think the worry is itjust places more and more pressure on the teaching staff so actually it is them that are going to have to end up working longer, harder to make this work. on average, heads said that the largest class size was now 33 pupils however the government said official statistics showed the average secondary class size has fallen over the past decade to just 20 pupils and that £40 billion has been spent on schools this year. the highest cash figure ever. later on in the show, we will be speaking to educators about the pressures being faced by schools. european leaders are continuing the second day of their summit in brussels today, but without theresa may. the british prime minister
9:11 am
left last night. the meeting was her last summit ahead of the formal triggering of the brexit process. mrs may was keen to downplay the situation, insisting that britain will continue to play a leading role in europe and offering suggestions on other topics including tackling organised crime. issues expected to be discussed today include the economy, security and external relations. it has emerged that some detainees held at an immigration removal centre near gatwick airport have been there for as long as two and a half years. prison inspectors found that children had also been detained at brook house which holds almost 400 adult male asylum seekers, illegal immigrants and foreign national offenders. the home office says some people prolong detention by trying to frustrate the removal process. seven people have been injured in an axe attack at the main railway station in the western german city of duesseldorf, police say. the attack happened at about 9pm local time yesterday. 0n person has been arrested.
9:12 am
a 36—year—old man from the former yugoslavia, suffers from psychological problems, according to duesseldorf police. patients and doctors have called for "do not resuscitate" notices to be replaced with orders that offer a range of treatments. currently, "do not resuscitate" orders instruct medical professionals not to use intensive and invasive treatments if a patient‘s heart stops beating or they stop breathing. a british medicaljournal article says a number of options should be discussed with patients instead. makers of game of thrones announced the show will return for its seventh season injuly. the show will return for its seventh season in july. fans the show will return for its seventh season injuly. fans watched an online video to see a block of ice being melt to see the air date which will be 17th july in being melt to see the air date which will be 17thjuly in the uk. it is the latest the show has aired as filming was delayed due to a lack of
9:13 am
wintry conditions! that's a summary of the latest bbc news — more at 9.30. thank you. you're getting in touch on school subjects being dropped. jonathan said, "i studied gcse astronomy. i felt because jonathan said, "i studied gcse astronomy. ifelt because it jonathan said, "i studied gcse astronomy. i felt because it was jonathan said, "i studied gcse astronomy. ifelt because it was not astronomy. ifelt because it was not a key subject it was marginalised andi a key subject it was marginalised and ijust a key subject it was marginalised and i just learnt it a key subject it was marginalised and ijust learnt it was scrapped from next year." another viewer says, "attended son's year eight options evening last night. he will only be allowed to do nine gcses of which only two are his chosen ones. the rest are compulsory." mike says, " if the rest are compulsory." mike says, "if funding is not forthcoming many less popular subjects will be lost. i'm fed up hearing that fund is at its highest ever. i am a teacher of design and technology. without this subject, no one would get confidence in diy, we will not provide the spark and thrill of using tools and
9:14 am
machinery, craftsmen, engineers and designers. dt can only run safely in smaller class sizes and therefore must be protected." keep them coming in. we will be talking more about them soon. now the sport with hugh. british cycling admitted to failings in their world—class programme after a d raft in their world—class programme after a draft version of the independent report was leaked overnight. let's find out more about what the report has said with matt lowton who has seen it and joins us on the phone this morning. matt, first of all, it talks about a culture of fear at british cycling? yeah, it does and we've been aware that that's the kind of tone that it was going to follow for sometime. it talks about a way that the world—class
9:15 am
performance programme was run by dave bra ilsford performance programme was run by dave brailsford and shane sutton. it will make for an interesting debate because as dave brailsford said recently he was medallists rather than sexist, i think, was the quote, and you know, it will open a debate about what constitutes hard coaching that delivers results and where that line is that a coach crosses in terms of the treatment of athletes, you know, it's a really interesting debate. you look at, you could look ata number of debate. you look at, you could look at a number of premier league football managers and wonder if they, how they would fair under this scrutiny. it talks about sir david aylesford being untouchable and questioning the leadership wallet is of steve sutton —— shane sutton. this all
9:16 am
started because of complaints made by jess started because of complaints made byjess varnish started because of complaints made by jess varnish about started because of complaints made byjess varnish about and sutton. this was the big thing form a full independent panel which has under this review which is yet to be published in its final version, it wasn't their remit to try and establish who was telling the truth between jess varnish establish who was telling the truth betweenjess varnish and shane sutton, it was more the way that the internal enquiry into thejess varnish allegations were handled by british cycling. they appointed one of their board members to conduct the investigation. she came back with her findings and the investigation. she came back with herfindings and of the investigation. she came back with her findings and of the the investigation. she came back with herfindings and of the nine allegations, it appears that she found that more than one was upheld. in the end when they reported publicly the conclusions, they only upheld one of the allegations of the
9:17 am
nine against shane sutton. what this report is saying is the british cycling board's report is saying is the british cycling boa rd's handling report is saying is the british cycling board's handling of the situation was inept. they reversed some of the findings and they sanitised alex russell's report. thank you very much for now. we should say that reduce cycling overnight said the world—class cycling programme focused without sufficient care to the athlete and environment. thank you. a new warning from headteachers about the pressures on our schools, this morning. they say schools are being forced to drop subjects, increase class sizes, and cut back on trips and after school clubs because of the funding crisis. the most common gcse and a level subjects to be dropped was design and technology, said the association of teachers and lecturers' poll of 1,000 members. that was followed by performing arts courses, music and languages, and art and design. the government insists it's putting a record amount of funding into schools and in this week's budget unveiled new cash for
9:18 am
existing schools and an expansion of the free schools programme. this morning, the education secretaryjustine greening will be addressing head teachers at their annual conference in birmingham. lets get reaction to this, and talk to carl ward, the chief executive of an academy group in stoke on trent, and the vice—president of the association of school and college leaders, carol herman, the head teacher at shenfield high school in essex and jake pinder, who is studying furniture and product design at nottingham trent university. thank you all very much forjoining us. karl, first of all, you are going to be on stage withjustine greening at the conference today. what message do you want her to get? the funding crisis is real but i need to make a couple of points. the first point i would agree with the dfc is that there is far more money then there has ever been, that is because we have more students entering the system. schools have
9:19 am
been suffering with flat cash budgets for the last three years. they have been making real—time cuts because costs have increased. that is one of the biggest issues. second one is with subjects being cut by schools, schools do not want to do that, but they are being forced into the back position because they have got to cut somewhere to decrease costs. the biggest issue there there is the problem with the accountability system. many of their subjects we can talk about, music, dt and so on, are not... any more. when schools have to make points. i also want to make clear the secretary of state cares really deeply about this issue so we really need to get together to find a common solution for us all. just speu common solution for us all. just spell out what is being cut and where? it is a survey by the
9:20 am
association of school and college leaders. the reality is costs have increased. for example, in my main school, over the last year we have reduced hours laughing by ten staff, echoes the biggest area of costs for any school staffing and that is where you can make the biggest savings. class sizes have increased from that active in certain areas. we are from that active in certain areas. we a re really from that active in certain areas. we are really looking at reducing as many we are really looking at reducing as ma ny costs we are really looking at reducing as many costs as possible. for the last three years we have had to find £350,000 from the current budget to deal with increased costs. in the next three years i will have to find further £150,000, in five years, thatis further £150,000, in five years, that is £500,000 out of the budget. every time teachers' pay increases and used money from the government to cover that. i don't any more. i have defined that from within the school budget. carol, you are a
9:21 am
headteacher. are you having to cut subjects? i am indeed. i am certainly considering it. the problem is even though we have a cat/ —— a flash cut budget, we have to look at increased national insurance contributions, pensions contributions and a pension levy and so contributions and a pension levy and so wonderful is top school like my own, shenfield high school, obviously we focus on the core subjects. for many that is their ticket into further education, higher education and employment. but we are also known here for our excellent sport and performing arts. we have to look for a carefully. we will not cut those because it is absolutely essential to the nature of the school, but we are having to look very carefully at other subjects such as design technology. this is exacerbated by the fact that teaches don't want to train in the
9:22 am
subjects any more, because the emphasis is far more on other subjects will stop its a real double bind. we may have to cut those slightly less popular subjects or ones with less kudos because of cost savings and actually, it is very difficult to recruit in those areas as well. it is a really tricky time for schools. jake, you are doing a degree in furniture and product design and you studied design at gcse and a—level, if you had not been able to study that what difference would it have made for you? it would have made it a lot more difficult to go to school. i am dyslexic and really struggle with english and maths and those core subjects. because i had this outlet which was designed technology, it encouraged me to go to school altogether. so what do you think about the fact that it is being seen as expendable in the face of budget difficulties? i think you will run
9:23 am
the risk of isolating a lot of children that aren't maybe as academically minded, or pushing out people that are not good at subject, what are known as core subjects like maths and sciences. sometimes, people need to be told they are good at something like a musician that cannot read or write or someone like me who was always good at drawing. that is all i enjoyed as well. it is difficult. carol, as you are listening to jake you are nodding. the department frederick and has put out a statement and it has said about that cash on schools is on record levels —— the department for education has put out a statement. going on to look at practical ways of helping schools, they say we recognise that schools are facing
9:24 am
cost pressures which is why will continue to use funding and look at best possible value. are there other ways to make the money go further? we offer a good at getting the best value already and we have been doing that because we have had to. i think what is really frustrating is announcements such as the ones in the budget where money is going into grammar schools and free schools, where actually existing schools are not being properly looked after. i would welcome conversations with justine greening and the chancellor who is actually an ex—boy of shenfield high school, pointing out what it is like on the ground. there is no evidence that grammar schools will support social mobility. we know only 3% of children in grammar schools are children on free school meals. it is not going to work necessarily. all the research is against it. let's have a look at
9:25 am
existing schools. we are absolutely committed to making sure we have a diverse, broad and balanced curriculum and that we are inclusive of all talents. if we have not got the right budget settlements, we are forced because of our accountability is to look at being less diverse and less inclusive and that is a great site with. you said you wanted to talk to justine greening site with. you said you wanted to talk tojustine greening and philip hammond. we also would have liked to. we invited them onto the programme but they were unable to put anyone up for us. that is a great shame. the system as it stands is unfairand great shame. the system as it stands is unfair and opaque and the changes mean half of england's schools will get a cash boost, how will that change the picture? get a cash boost, how will that change the picture ?|j get a cash boost, how will that change the picture? i think it will change the picture? i think it will change the picture? i think it will change the pit your for those schools that get a cash boost. there are winners and losers in this is.
9:26 am
there is going to be rebalancing overtime and it is important to know at the moment that the proposals out for the nationalfunding at the moment that the proposals out for the national funding formula are a proposal, we are in consultation period with that. that is why i think it is important that the government and education system need to work together to find a common area and common ground to move forwards. it is only working in corporation where we can use forward —— move forward most importantly to provide a fantastic education for students. i am a. i provide a fantastic education for students. iam a. i have provide a fantastic education for students. i am a. i have two children. i have seen from the coal face, from eye on children who are at primary school at the moment, for example having to pay for after—school clubs. that should not be happening. if that primary school is in be happening. if that primary school isina be happening. if that primary school is in a position where they cannot provide after—school clubs because they have not got the money and pa rents they have not got the money and parents have to provide that, then we have a pretty serious problem in the education system for funding. martin has e—mailed and said i have
9:27 am
been a teacherfor six martin has e—mailed and said i have been a teacher for six years and this doesn't is destroying the quality of education. i work in a rare community school and we worked incredibly hard. with the new cuts it will be impossible. teachers are devastated to close down a level groups and often leave teaching altogether. if all we see is budget cuts, it is released that. chris is a performing arts teacher and he says please take education away from politicians. they know nothing about what is needed in schools. it is said to moralising to see idiotic decisions made without any thought consequences for the children and staff. it is actually heartbreaking. do you think subjects like dt, german and music, subjects which are not necessarily that efficient for schools to teach because they do have fewer students, do you think they will disappear off the curriculum. i think there is a danger that they will. the issue is
9:28 am
acute and they need to deal with things quickly. because schools are coping but they will not down the line. the system will feed through like that and it will hurt everybody. i think it is a real shame that we are in a position that headteachers across the country in many schools are doing a fantastic job, under tough financial circumstances to keep these in place, and i think it is a real shame that they are having to make decisions to narrow the curriculum when they don't want to, and it is partly because of funding and partly because the accountability system now means you have got to make tough choices to do that. it is the wrong thing for children. thank you all very much and do keep your comments coming in on that. they are always welcome. still to come, it has emerged some detainees at a removal centre near gatwick airport have been there for 2.5 years. the home 0ffice been there for 2.5 years. the home office as they do not want to detain
9:29 am
people for longer than necessary. we will find out why they are being held for so long. and is it time to vacate the houses of parliament to carry out essential restoration? the old building has asbestos, leeks and electrical faults. putting it right there will cost around £4 billion. let us know what you think about that. first of all, let's catch up with all of the news. good morning. bt has bowed to pressure from telecoms regulator 0fcom to legally separate 0penreach, which runs the uk's broadband infrastructure. 0fcom says 0penreach will become a distinct company with its own staff, management and strategy. it will also have to consult with customers such as sky and talktalk on major investments. the regulator had been pushing for the move following complaints about poor levels of service and had threatened to force bt to make the change. labour has accused the government of being in "disarray" after the prime minister said controversial tax rises for self—employed workers would not
9:30 am
be put into legislation until the autumn. theresa may said the changes to national insurance, announced in the budget, were necessary and fair but said the chancellor would listen to concerns before mps voted on the measures later this year. schools in england are being forced to cut gcse and a—level courses in an effort to balance the books, according to a head teachers' union. the association of school and college leaders has warned budget pressures are driving up class sizes and causing them to cancel activities such as social clubs and school trips. members of the organisation are due to raise their concerns with the education secretary, justine greening, when she addresses their annual conference in birmingham today. european leaders are continuing the second day of their summit in brussels today, but without theresa may who left last night. the meeting was the prime minister's last summit ahead of the formal triggering of the brexit process. mrs may was keen to downplay the situation, insisting that britain will continue to play a leading role in europe and offering suggestions on other topics including tackling organised crime.
9:31 am
seven people have been injured in an axe attack at the main railway station in the german city of duesseldorf, police say. the attack happened at about 9pm local time yesterday. one person has been arrested. a 36—year—old man from the former yugoslavia, who suffers from psychological problems, according to duesseldorf police. protests are taking place in seoul after south korea's highest court upheld a decision to remove the country's president from office. park geun—hye was impeached over a corruption scandal, involving a close friend. she will now lose her immunity against prosecution and could face charges. the decision was met by cheering in the streets from opponents of ms park, but her supporters have reacted angrily. police say two people have died during protests outside the court. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 10am. thank you. lots of you getting in
9:32 am
touch on school subjects being cut. brian says, "cutting a subject like design and technology when the government is announcing tech levels. typical attitude of headteachers and other teachers thinking these subjects are irrelevant. i was a dt teacher for yea rs before irrelevant. i was a dt teacher for years before retiring. it is not woodwork which some teachers call it today." vincent says, "there are not enough kids to take these courses so they are not cost effective. it makes common sense." another teacher says, "i resigned from my post as the writing had been on the wall already. i was extremely happy or i am happy teaching at an international school in brazil. no 0fsted, smaller class sizes and accommodation provided by the school and a culture that's healthy. soon there will be a shortage of good teachers." so there will be a shortage of good teachers. " so many there will be a shortage of good teachers." so many of you getting in touch. keep your comments coming in. we love to get them. now the sport with hugh.
9:33 am
british cycling have admitted to failings in their world class performance programme after a draft version of the independent report into the sport's governing body was leaked overnight. it claims there is a "culture of fear" among staff at british cycling and that an internal british cycling report following jess varnish's claims of sexism against former technical director shane sutton was "sanitised". manchester united can claim they got a good result on a bad pitch. henrikh mkitaryan scored the away goal in a 1—1 draw at rostov in the first leg of their europa league last 16 tie. england's cricketers, cruise in the caribbean. victory in the third one day international in barbados secures a 3—0 series whitewash. that's it for now. it's emerged that some detainees at an immigration removal centre near gatwick airport have been held there for as long as two—and—a—half years.
9:34 am
let's get more on this from our home affairs correspondent, danny shaw. two—and—a—half years without charge? yes. because these are people who include foreign offenders, people who are asylum seekers who are waiting for their claims to be processed and people who are illegally in the country. it doesn't mean they have broken any law, but they have been detained at brooke house immigration centre near gatwick airport. it holds 400 men and what we learn from this inspection report into brooke house is that the average stay for detainees there has increased substantially. it is now a couple of months, two or three months the average stay and 23 people were held for over a year. of whom four were held for longer than two years. and the longest stay was over two—and—a—half years. i've learned from this report, if you borough into the detail that two children
9:35 am
we re into the detail that two children were held at the centre mistakenly, they were categorised as adults by an immigration officer. they were held for two months. how old were they? we don't know their ages, but social services reassessed them and said they are children so they shouldn't have been held at a centre for adults. why are people held for so long? well, these decisions about whether someone is allowed to stay in the country or leave are difficult. they're tricky. they're not straightforward and once a decision has been made getting them to actually get on to a flight can be very difficult because they need documentation, sometimes the country to which they're going doesn't want to which they're going doesn't want to ta ke to which they're going doesn't want to take themment flights have to be arranged and then the detainee themselves may have a number of different appeal processes that they are allowed to go through. so these are allowed to go through. so these are complex matters and they can ta ke are complex matters and they can take sometime. the home office is saying that some people are deliberately trying to frustrate the process and in doing so, they're prolonging their stay of detention. they are almost saying it is their
9:36 am
own fault in some of the cases. is there a finite period, i mean, the processes have to run out at some point. these four are still there, two—and—a—half years on, how much longer can they be there? they were documented as being there for that length of time. there is no time limit on how long someone can be held, but a review last year into immigration detention across the uk said, you know, that the use of it should be reduced because it is expensive. it costs £34,000 per detainee per year and around half of those detained aren't removed. they're released back into the community and while you're detained in those conditions and brooke house is akin to a prison in the way that it is set—up, why you're detained, you will see the welfare, the health of those people can deteriorate so there are concerns there. thank you very much, danny. a couple say they were ecstatic
9:37 am
after having twins. russia says it is doing everything in its power to organise a safe world cup, without the violence that marred the european championship in france last year. russian hooligans were involved in street battles then, with england fans among their prime targets. this week, britain's top police official for football has been in russia to check how safe it is for travelling fans. sarah rainsford reports from st petersburg. in marseille, english fans became one of the top targets for a new breed of russian hooligan, more athletic, disciplined and organised than the english
9:38 am
hooligans they once modelled themselves on. so this week britain's top policeman for football was in russia to compare notes on known troublemakers and to ensure security measures ahead of the world cup. i think anyone watching that would have been absolutely appalled. what we need to do is build on the good working relationship and try to do everything to ensure that anyone coming to russia for the games is safe. russia dismisses what happened in france as a one—off, and it insists that any talk of a hooligan problem here is just propaganda. it's clearly anxious, because of course the last thing russia wants at the world cup is embarrassingly empty stands. there has never been a single incident during major sporting events in russia that proves that we can really organise great atmosphere. we're not dangerous because hooligans in russia, they worry about fighting because the police can cage them and we can go to prison and it will be big problems here. the human rights lawyer amal clooney
9:39 am
has urged the un to act against so—called islamic state by backing a uk—led investigation into the group's atrocities in iraq. speaking at the un, mrs clooney said is had declared it will "destroy" the country's yazidi ethnic group through murder, rape and forced conversions. she told the un she wanted to know why no action had been taken. mass graves in iraq lie unprotected and unexhumed. witnesses are fleeing, and not one isis militant has faced trial for international crimes anywhere in the world. so i am speaking to you, the iraqi government, and to you, un member states, when i ask, why? why is it that nothing has been done? i wish to speak directly to prime minister abadi. on behalf of all isis' victims, i call on you to send the letter to the security council requesting
9:40 am
an investigation into isis' crimes. getting the un involved was initially iraq's idea, and finally taking action to make this a reality would silence those who doubt your commitment to bring daesh tojustice. and finally to all of the un member states, if this road to accountability through the security council is blocked, you must take initiative to secure accountability in other ways available to you under the un charter. don't let this be another rwanda, where you regret doing too little, too late. don't let isis get with genocide. later ms clooney and yazidi genocide survivor nadia murad explained why she'd called on the un to act. i think you have to ask the iraqi government why the iraqi government hasn't acted
9:41 am
to create this investigation. clearly they're not able to do it themselves on the ground, you know? there are a grand total of 32 forensic pathologists in iraq to try and deal with all of these crimes that have been committed. we know that they are not able to conduct investigations and prosecutions themselves because there have not been any prosecutions of isis members for crimes of sexual violence, for crimes committed against the yazidis, international crimes including genocide. so there is no reason for them not to act. they have themselves asked for un assistance and, even today, you heard the iraqi ambassador ask for un assistance with the investigation, so we have to translate these public statements into an actual deed that will make this happen on the ground, and that's why i made a clear call at the end directly to the prime minister of iraq to say "send a letter to the un security council requesting this investigation and it will happen." it's not too much to ask, it's really not that difficult, it's in the interest not only of yazidi victims but of all iraqis, because all sects of iraq has been
9:42 am
victims of isis's violence. and it's really time to act now. there's no excuse for any further delay. loads of you getting in touch. louise says, "why deny children of the subjects of their choice? we need all skills, not just the subjects of their choice? we need all skills, notjust academics. teachers need to be seen as professionals and allowed to do theirjob professionals and allowed to do their job without professionals and allowed to do theirjob without meddling about government and 0fsted." kathy says, "a payment was made about —— a comment was made about comment. we need funding for teachers to teach in the real—time of school to help the children to achieve the required level of maths and english." keep your thoughts coming in.
9:43 am
it's going to cost £4 billion to fix the houses of parliament and stop this world—famous site slowly crumbling into the thames. it is a huge amount of public money, but as these pictures show, the buildings are in a very poor state of repair. is there any way of keeping the costs d own ? the influential public accounts committee the most effective way of keeping costs down is by asking them all to leave the building for a whole six years, whilst works commence. but where should politicians go and should politicians think of going to a place other than the south of england and london? joining us now is the snp's philip boswell who sits on the mps' public accounts committee and before becoming a politician was a surveyor specialising in sandstone. the material that parliament is made out of. and also dr faiza shaheem, director of class, the centre for labour and social studies. thank you both forjoining us.
9:44 am
philip, with your surveyor‘s hat on then, tell us why £4 billion to fix what the issues are, what are the issues? well, good morning joanna. well, first of all, it is a limestone which can be classified as sandstone, but the stone work is in poor repair, but particularly its the services that cause a problem and water ingres. so there is lots of problems that have been storing up of problems that have been storing up over the years and the decades in fa ct, up over the years and the decades in fact, although quite a lot of work has been done, there is a serious risk there could be a catastrophic failure, it could be electrical fire. it could be, it is something that the drains are regularly blocking up. it could be any number of things that cause an emergency situation whereby we would have no planned removal to another location which would cost even more. so it sounds like doing nothing is not an option? that's correct. how quickly would it need to be done? well, there are a few options on the table
9:45 am
at the moment and we need to understand that we're still at quite an early stage of development. the project is yet to find itself. we are looking at options or the project teams that will be put in place will be looking at various es, place will be looking at various ogses, but you have to put better definition around that to understand what the true costs will be and to understand the works that will be carried out and of course, you have to select which option you prefer to go ahead with. so there is a lot of work still to be done. the £4 billion isn't a quote to be signed off on, it is an estimate, but it is a mind blowing amount. i mean, obviously, it is a very special building. it's a big building. but how is £4 billion the figure that's arrived at? sp first we should be clear what the order of magnitude estimate is. there is very little definition about the exec nature of the works. the option, certainly, if you ask
9:46 am
any quantity surveyor or project manager, they will automatically say that a full to count is the best option. there is a lot of work still to be carried out. we need disruptive surveys, dilapidation surveys. we need to get in to look at the amount of asbestos which is down there. the 36 rises which create a fire hazard. there is still a huge amount of work to be done before we can determine the optimum solution for this. £4 billion is a lot of money but it is a world heritage iconic building and it belongs to every citizen of the uk. so faiza you look at this and see it as an option for mps to move out of london for a while? yes, when you look at the regional divides in this country and the inequalities which have been left gaping open for
9:47 am
years, when you see the opportunities for politicians to be in manchester or birmingham, somewhere outside of london, at a time when people feel all editions are not speaking to them unless you live in london and the south—east, what an amazing opportunity this is at least in the interim to decamp. and what about the money?m at least in the interim to decamp. and what about the money? it is an important building and i understand that money has to be spent. we can think about how it has be done over time. i have not looked at the numbers in any detail. maybe if we move parliament out of london for some period of time maybe we can do the work slower, maybe that will make it cheaper? i do know. it is not a question of not investing in that building, it is a question of democracy and the opportunity to go back to some basic questions about why we have parliament in london
9:48 am
stock london has everything, a commercial centre, a financial centre, eddisbury unusual to have all of in one place. -- it is very unusual to have all that in one place. do you think there is an option to move out of london?m place. do you think there is an option to move out of london? it was an option and it is the consideration i would have some sympathy for. however, the public accou nts sympathy for. however, the public accounts committee, we can look at the evidence that is but for us and since that option was removed prior to coming to public accounts, it is not an option we have been able to look at. so it is possible, it is not totally off the table? look at. so it is possible, it is not totally off the table ?|j look at. so it is possible, it is not totally off the table? i believe it is an option which has been removed prior to any detailed cost estimates which have been carried out. it was initially mooted as a possibility but sadly it has been removed. there are other options. there are other sites. i asked several witnesses whether it was possible to partially decamp which
9:49 am
is another edge and to make it cheaper or at least to keep some activity in the palace, but as i said earlier, no doubt the cheapest option and what we recommend is backing up that the joint committee found, that a full decamp would give us the best and most effective option. thank you both. a couple have spoken of theirjoy after becoming parents to children conceived with the help of two lesbian surrogate mothers. tracy and pete akoun suffered repeated miscarriages and fell victim to a con—woman as they battled to fulfil their dream. they then met tricia hunt and kate fruin—smith, two lesbians who each have their own partners and children and live in different parts of the uk. the group came together, and nyobi and kenya who you can see here with tracy and pete, were born last summer exactly one month apart. tracy isjoining us on
9:50 am
tracy is joining us on the line and kate, one of these are but mothers is with us. tracy, you had miscarriages and one failed surrogacy attempt. before kenya and nyobi arrived, how were you feeling about the prospect of whether parenthood would happen to two?m isa dream parenthood would happen to two?m is a dream which you think will never happen. it just is a dream which you think will never happen. itjust seemed so far away for us. on top of the fact that our own personal losses, you feel it all slipping away. how did you find tricia and kate? i was actually brought into our closed group hope by another surrogates who is obviously now a very good friend of
9:51 am
ours andi obviously now a very good friend of ours and i got talking to kate and tricia as friends in the group that way. and then when things went wrong with our initial farragut, they stepped in —— when things went wrong with our initial surrogates. kate had got the all clear from her co nsulta nt had got the all clear from her consultant to be a surrogate again and we got talking and that is when it happened. were you intending to try for two babies at once ordered that just happened ? try for two babies at once ordered that just happened? try for two babies at once ordered thatjust happened? pete and i decided we wanted two. we took in consideration our age and the fact that pete is a twin, he wanted his children close together. we just felt that is what we wanted for us asa felt that is what we wanted for us as a family. kate, you obviously we re as a family. kate, you obviously were one of the surrogates mums, you had done it previously? yes, my first surrogate baby is nearly three
9:52 am
now. why did you decide to do it? it is an amazing experience. the experience i have from my first written in c which was not a good pregnancy made me realise that the short—term pain was worth the long—term gain and being able to see those families develop was so worth the pregnancy. when i saw the heartache that pete and tracy went through, i knew that they were somebody i wanted to help. they deserved to have that happy ending after everything they went through and they were still positive and a happy and supportive couple towards other people. people find it very ha rd to other people. people find it very hard to get to grips with the thought of carrying a baby, delivering that baby and then handing it over. how was that? the babies are conceived with surrogacy. they are not conceived to be our children. even before they are conceived we are very much in the
9:53 am
mindset that we are carrying for somebody else. that baby was never intended to be part of my family or my make up. when i am going through pregnancy, the visualisation is tracy and pete and my family, not my family. when i was pregnant with minel family. when i was pregnant with mine i envisaged them growing up as you do as a parent. ukip sure what they will be like. you have four -- you picture what they would be like. i have four and my wife's carried another. tracy, you go into a vulnerable situation top did you feel possible that kate or one of the other surrogates parents might have decided to keep the baby? no, never. never in a million years. kate actually said initially that we would not be paying any expenses up
9:54 am
until we had our first would not be paying any expenses up until we had ourfirst scam to reassure us that there was an actual ad there. —— ourfirst reassure us that there was an actual ad there. —— our first scan. reassure us that there was an actual ad there. —— ourfirst scan. —— to reassure us there was an actual baby there. and i think you were not together when you gave birth? she was too impatient. by the time tracey and pete arrived at the hospital she had already arrived. what is it like as one unusual but blended family? when they came into the room, the look on their faces was worth every minute. the whole journey was worth a look on their faces to see their daughter and to com plete faces to see their daughter and to complete their family like that, if the something that nobody can ever describe. and tracy? kate will tell
9:55 am
you, she will laugh now, she will know i am crying now. at that moment, there is nothing can describe it. it is indescribable. and then there is that point when tracy you walk away with kenya and kate, you are left behind?” tracy you walk away with kenya and kate, you are left behind? i did not feel left behind. we keep in contact. feel left behind. we keep in co nta ct. as feel left behind. we keep in contact. as soon as they were in the cari contact. as soon as they were in the car i was getting pictures of them on theirfirstjourney car i was getting pictures of them on their firstjourney home. i a lwa ys on their firstjourney home. i always knew that is how they would be. they would go off. we have a family have planned ourfamily holidays and things like that for afterwards. kenya being injuly meant we had all our summer holidays andi meant we had all our summer holidays and i was raring to get back to being with my children and give them the quality time that they deserve as well. tracy, how would you describe yourfamily, as well. tracy, how would you describe your family, how do you see this situation? it is perfect. it is
9:56 am
absolutely perfect. the aim of doing this media is to promote surrogacy, to give people who have no hope another option that is acceptable and to promote the conference on saturday which is run by an organisation to give people the information because there is nothing more devastating, as a wife particularly, it is the one thing you are supposed to do is create a family. and it can be hard. lovely to talk to both. good luck with everything. ijust want everything. i just want to bring you everything. ijust want to bring you some comments on subjects and schools being cut because of constraints on budgets. lots and lots of you still getting in touch. tim has e—mailed to say in further education colleges we have had 24% of cuts in funding over the last five years with redundancies every year. the bulls have less contact time and teachers
9:57 am
have less contact time and teachers have doubled the amount of work —— pupils have less contact time. the funding in education is absolutely dire, regardless of what the government says. stephen e—mails saying cutting funding for design technology is outrageous. this subject is wide my career and add me setting up a company which has generated millions for the uk economy. another person says why do schools with this more numbers of children taking their subjects alba may to with another —— why don't schools with small number will of pupils amalgamate with another will stop sonia says tech levels are needed, yet deeply and art and design are being cut. and another e—mail says i work in a small rural primary school, always rated as good by 0fsted. funding has been
9:58 am
dwindling to such an extent that we have had to make all but one teaching assistant redundant and may lose a teacher as well. the government seems hell—bent on pushing through its own education agenda when many schools are struggling to make ends meet. i have seriously considered quitting because the stress has had an impact on my family life and health. now let's join on my family life and health. now let'sjoin nick on my family life and health. now let's join nick miller for whether at date. how are things? do you remember the sunshine yesterday? it was glorious. is that it? look at that. you can just about see some of portsmouth through that. the sun will come back eventually but for now it is a very different story. it is misty and murky for many of us got a lot of the murky and damp stuff is across the west of
9:59 am
the uk. the further east you other have been some glimmers sunshine. we had a lovely sunrise in hull, city of culture and city of cracking sunrises. not a huge amount of rain around but it is ample and drizzly across parts of wales, western england and northern ireland. an area of rainfall moving north across scotland. it is possible you may counter some of that patchy rain at times. let's take a look at things in more detail this afternoon. you will notice the temperatures in double figures. yesterday, in the best of the sunshine, 17.5 celsius. we are not getting back today. i think there will be some towards the north—east of wales, into cheshire, north cornwall, devon and somerset and maybe along the north coast of northern ireland a few brighter burst into north—east scotland. but
10:00 am
in the northern isles there are outbreaks of rain. the winds an night as they will be tonight. plenty of cloud tonight as well. temperature is not going down too far. if you're going to the six nations rugby in cardiff you do not need too many layers of top again, the possibility of seeing some drizzle around times. you will get an area of rain moving through northern ireland and in scotland. england and wales mainly drive. a mild start to the weekend. but it is mainly cloudy start to the weekend. things would improve though. they will improve for scotland and northern ireland. it edges into northern england, north and west wales and maybe the far south—west of england. notice scotland and northern ireland brightens up. parts of east anglia and south—east england also sees in sunny spells. as ashley and south—east england with any sunshine, it is not out of
10:01 am
the question you could get 18 celsius. spring is very much in evidence. sunday is a messy picture. there are spells of wet weather moving through. it will turn a little bit cooler from the west late in the weekend. whatever you're doing, have great weekend. sp it's10am. i'm joanna gosling. a decision on hiking taxes for the self—employed won't be voted on until the autumn. we'll hearfrom a labour mp. her party is calling it a partial u—turn. do you take your babies in their pushchair during the morning school run? well, experts are urging parents to cover prams to protect babies from exhaust fumes and high levels of air pollution. ido i do think about it quite a lot. there is not much we can do. we live in the centre of london so there is
10:02 am
pollution everywhere. and are we living in a golden age of satire? there's been more and more interest in seeing the funny side of politics and people in power. we'll talk to writers and performers who say politics in 2017 is providing more material than they ever thought possible. what is that picture doing in here? that'sjust a what is that picture doing in here? that's just a plate what is that picture doing in here? that'sjust a plate of mashed potatoes. we're lucky that trump is going to provide the jokes for the foreseeable future! annita mcveigh is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the rest of the day's news. bt has bowed to pressure from telecoms regulator 0fcom to legally separate 0penreach which runs the uk's broadband infrastructure. the regulator was pushing for the move following complaints about a poor level of performance. the decisions it takes in terms of
10:03 am
investment have to work for the interests of the whole country. and we would expect to see from this, both better service, but also better broadband. labour has accused the government of being in "disarray" after the prime minister said controversial tax rises for self—employed workers would not be put into legislation until the autumn. theresa may said the changes to national insurance, announced in the budget, were necessary and fair but said the chancellor would listen to concerns before mps voted on the measures later this year. european leaders are continuing the second day of their summit in brussels today, but without theresa may who left last night. the meeting was the prime minister's last summit ahead of the formal triggering of the brexit process. mrs may was keen to downplay the situation, insisting that britain will continue to play a leading role in europe and offering suggestions on other topics including tackling organised crime. schools in england are being forced
10:04 am
to cut gcse and a—level courses in an effort to balance the books, according to a head teachers' union. the association of school and college leaders has warned budget pressures are driving up class sizes and causing them to cancel activities such as social clubs and school trips. carole herman is a head teacher at a school in essex. she told this programme the issue is extremely complicated. we focus on the core subjects. for many students that is their ticket into further education, higher education and employment. we are also known here for our excellence in sport and performing arts. we're having to look very carefully. now, we won't cut those because it is absolutely central to the nature of the school, but we're having to look very carefully at other subjects such as design technology. this is exacerbated, actually, by the fact that teachers actually don't want to train in these subjects any more because the emphasis is far more on the ebacc subjects. so it's a real double bind. protests are taking place in seoul
10:05 am
after south korea's highest court upheld a decision to remove the country's president from office. park geun—hye was impeached over a corruption scandal, involving a close friend. she will now lose her immunity against prosecution and could face charges. the decision was met by cheering in the streets from opponents of ms park, but her supporters have reacted angrily. police say two people have died during protests outside the court. makers of the hit fantasy tv show game of thrones have announced the show will return for its seventh season injuly. fans watched an online video for more than an hour to see a huge block of ice being melted to reveal the air date which will be 17thjuly in the uk. it's the latest the award—winning series has ever aired as filming was delayed due to a lack of wintry conditions. that's a summary of the latest bbc news. more at 10.30am. nigel says "we pushed hard for our
10:06 am
son's school to keep design technology. he went on to motorsport engineering and is employed as lead quality engineer at aston martin. he would not have achieved his goal without doing design technology. more engineers are needed." this viewer says, "we are a design couple and are saddened that creativity is being stifled by government cuts. we flourished when traditional core subjects were not our strength. this door to creativity opened up incredible opportunities and enabled us to travel the world with our careers." thank you for those. keep your comments coming in. do get in touch with us throughout the morning — use #victorialive and if you text, you will be charged at the standard network rate. here's some sport now with hugh. a leaked report into british cycling has levelled serious criticisms at the door of the sport's governing body
10:07 am
which has admitted failings in its world class performance programme. the draft version of the report by uk sport appears to reveal these key findings — that there is a "culture of fear" among staff at british cycling, some of whom are "frightened to speak out and are being bullied". former performance director sir dave brailsford was "untouchable" and took decisions about the multi—million pound budget himself and former technical director shane sutton was said to be unsuitable for a leadership role. the review alleges that british cycling's own report intojess varnish's claims of sexism against shane sutton where this story began was "sanitised" after the grievance officer found varnish's allegations were largely true but british cycling chose to leave out his findings in their report. the review concludes those actions were "shocking and inexcusable". british cycling have responded with a statement accepting that "leadership focused on medal delivery without sufficient care
10:08 am
and attention to the staff and athlete culture. " while they disagree with the factual accuracy of certain points, the body's board admits that there was not "adequate oversight" leading to a failure to "address the early warning signs". jose mourinho said it was "impossible to play any better" after his manchester united side drew 1—1 at fc rostov in the europa league last night. mourinho wasn't impressed with the rough pitch. but henrikh mkhitaryan scored an away goal and although the russian side equalised. mourinho said that football life was "full of experiences" and that was a new one for united. the second leg is next week. england goalkeeperjoe hart doesn't think he'll play for manchester city again. he was dropped by pep guardiola when he took over as manager at the start of the season and sent on loan to torino in italy. he bears no grudge against city though.
10:09 am
i love that club and i always said as long as they wanted me, i would be there, but i was always cautious when i said that because i'm aware that other big clubs, stuff can change quickly and opinions and people in charge, not everyone is going to like you. not everyone is going to like you. not everyone is going to like you. not everyone is going to want to play you and that's the business side of it. england one—day captain eoin morgan described alex hales' innings as "unbelievable", after he set them on their way to a 3—0 series victory over west indies. hales was back in the side after recovering from a broken hand and he scored a century in the third and final one—dayer in barbados. joe root also made 100 as england hit a record total for the ground of 328. the west indies were bowled out well short of that target, england winning by 186 runs. wales and ireland launch the penultimate weekend of six nations action tonight. anything other than a victory for ireland will end their bid for a third title in four years. they're second in the table, behind england, who take on scotland for the calcutta cup tomorrow. and can claim the championship at twickenham if ireland don't win. commentary on radio 5 live from the
10:10 am
principality stadium. that's it for now. labour has claimed the government is in disarray after theresa may said controversial budget tax rises would not go before mps until the autumn. let's go to westminster and bring in iani watson. is the government getting cold feet in the face of a rebellion over this? i think certainly a touch of cold feet, certainly a touch of cold feet, certainly a touch of cold feet, certainly a shiver up the spine of the governmentjoanna for the following reasons. there is a logic to increasing the contributions of self—employed people because they're getting benefits they didn't previously get such as the state pension, but the politics, i think, is far more dangerous than the economics because many conservative mps say, look, this is not what we said in our manifesto and secondly, we're hitting people that might be
10:11 am
likely to vote for the conservative party. so effectively, the timing of this measure is crucial by delaying a parliamentary vote until the autumn, that will be after the publication of a review into working practises which might actually offer self—employed people more rights and benefits. rights to maternity and pa personity leave. so the government could argue, look you're getting more value for money out of this national insurance increase. we get a second budget. if the rebellion hasn't been quelled, then the chancellor would have some flexibility to perhaps even potentially delay the implementation. i was speaking earlier to the conservative mp neil carmichael, he chairs the education committee. he says there is lots of concern in his constituency about the changes. so i was asking him if it would be enough to offer self—employed people more rights or whether the chancellor would have to go further and think again about how the whole reform is implemented? go further and think again about how the whole reform is implemented7m we're expecting people to be sort of
10:12 am
active in the economic system as entrepreneurs taking risks we've got to demonstrate that we are aware of that and willing to mitigate some of those risks. so that's an important point. the wider question about taxation, of course, is we have got to increase tax take in order to pay for the things that we might want to pay for. education clearly being one of them and also the risks that we might confront on leaving the european union. so it's important that we have a tax system which works fairly and efficiently in terms of getting the money in. works fairly and efficiently in terms of getting the money inm works fairly and efficiently in terms of getting the money in. is it a package that says look, self—employed people could get value for money? they will get more of the rights that employed people would get that would satisfy people like you and your constituents or would you and your constituents or would you and your constituents or would you and some colleagues be holding out for a re—think on the implementation of the time scale on the tax rise itself? i think a re—think on the implementation is probably the most likely outcome.
10:13 am
because at the end of the day, you know, we are going to have to get some tax. so, i think, know, we are going to have to get some tax. so, ithink, we've know, we are going to have to get some tax. so, i think, we've got to recognise that and be bold enough to stick with the overall direction of travel, but make sure it's more comfortable for those that are basically travelling. here is the real problem for the chancellor — if you're making that direction of travel more co mforta ble, direction of travel more comfortable, you're going to raise less money for the treasury. so it could be possible that philip hammond goes through all this political pain and doesn't make the government significantly better off at the end of it. ok, thank you very much. let's bring in rachel reeves, the government says it is right to equalise the way people are treated in terms of taxation, how do you see it? well, i'm all for cracking down on bogus self employment and avoiding people incorporating to avoiding people incorporating to avoid paying those national insurance contributions, but we do need to better help and support people who are self—employed, who
10:14 am
are entrepreneurs setting up on their own in part because they are taking more risk and they don't get access to the same sickness benefits and the same maternity and paternity rights and universal credit. so i think that it is wrong to just increase the tax take on self—employed without giving them any additional support to make a success of their business and the reality is, the government are cutting taxes for the biggest businesses, £3.8 billion cut in corporation tax and yet asking the self—employed to pay an additional £2 billion in taxes. i don't think those are right priorities. i think we should be asking more of those with the broadest shoulders and helping small businesses and the self—employed to make a better contribution to our economy. would you be appeased if there were more benefits for the self—employed over rights from the state? i moon the
10:15 am
government is saying there is almost equal treatment at the moment. there will be a review into modern employment practises. would that make you change your mind? it doesn't sound like anything would? it is true with the flat rate pension that over time people who are self—employed will start to benefit from a pension they didn't previously get, but when you look at other benefits like maternity and paternity leave and maternity and paternity leave and maternity and paternity pay, like for example, sickness and disability benefits, out of work benefits, you don't have the same sort of access if you are self—employed. so, if the chancellor wa nts to self—employed. so, if the chancellor wants to go further, and look at those whole range of benefits i think that would be something that we could support and we could get behind, but at moment we don't have anything like those guarantees. all we know is the self—employed are going to have to pay higher national insurance without getting those benefits that many of the rest of us ta ke benefits that many of the rest of us take for granted. we also need to do more to help the self—employed access pensions and mortgages. in
10:16 am
the private sectorment if you are self—employed. .. the private sectorment if you are self-employed. .. that's a different issue, isn't it? just focussing on the tax take from the self—employed here. the government is pointing out that if it were not to be getting this extra cash from the self—employed with the national insurance increase, there wouldn't be the money that was announced in the budget for social care, an extra £2 billion going into social care? well, as i said the government is cutting corporation tax. they are cutting corporation tax. they are cutting inheritance tax for the richest estates and that is costing taxpayers £1 billion. the government are cutting taxes for the better off. i want more money going into the national health service and the ca re system. the national health service and the care system. i do think it is right to be cutting services for the best of while asking the self—employed to pay more. there is an important
10:17 am
point. self—employed people are taking additional risks which were not taking if you are directly employed and you miss out on things both in terms of state benefits through the national insurance system but also, you do find it harder to access things like pensions in the private sector as well. there is something different about being self—employed and the government needs to recognise that. that is why traditionally the southern point have paid less. i recognise with the growth in self employment that needs to be looked at again, but so do the rights that come from paying into national insurance and those are some of the things we have just spoken about. thank you. still to come: more and more people are seeing the funny side of being in power and politics in general. we will find out why we are in a golden age of satire. first, an independent watchdog has
10:18 am
warned that britain's aid programme in libya could be harming migrants. a report said britain's support lead to more migrants being detained and denied a right to asylum. we can speak to the 0xfam policy adviser. we alsojoined by speak to the 0xfam policy adviser. we also joined by the conservative mpjeremy we also joined by the conservative mp jeremy lefroy who was we also joined by the conservative mpjeremy lefroy who was a member of the international development committee. and here in the studio i enjoyed by doctorjohn campbell from the school of oriental and african. josephine, spell out why the british aid could actually be making things worse for migrants? 0xfam works with people who had to leave their home due to conflict, violence, poverty and disaster and all around the world. in the companies in which we work, we see first—hand the transformative effect that foreign aid can have when it is targeting
10:19 am
people when it addresses the issues of poverty and suffering. we can see how it saves lives. what this report looks at is areas where foreign aid is used to prevent people migrating to europe or foreign is used to prevent people migrating to europe orforeign aid used as a bargaining chip to have agreements with third countries to prevent mobility and migration to europe. this is where the report finds that this must never be the sole objective of foreign aid and assistance and that is something which 0xfam wholeheartedly second is because not only is it ineffective, it also puts people's lives at risk and that was made in the case of libya and it also risks undermining development in fact by restricting mobility. in libya we are seeing a situation where the uk and other
10:20 am
european governments are trying to prevent people from leaving libya to seek safety in europe, and also looking at ways in which they would return people back to libya. these are return people back to libya. these a re really return people back to libya. these are really concerning developments and we know from our operations, 0xfam's operations in italy, where we work with people who have left libya and made the horrendous journey across the mediterranean, who tell us about the human rights by nations they have witnessed, the beatings, the kidnappings and forced labour, so that libya is rulli situation they themselves describe as hell. it is really worrying to see trends in which the uk and other european governments are trying to pave the way in which vulnerable people would not be able to leave situations of human rights violations be returned there. jeremy lefroy, you are on the international development committee, are you concerned that aid might be doing more harm than good?” concerned that aid might be doing more harm than good? i don't think the uk is doing more harm than good
10:21 am
at all. the report points out that there are cases where because of support slave for the libyan coast guard, people have been returned to the coast of libya and maybe in camps or places where there are real problems with human rights violations. clearly, we need to look at that. however, the report also looks at the work of the united kingdom in ethiopia, and in nigeria, and in both those cases, the work of the uk in those countries is really helping the governments to work with refugees. ethiopia has an open door policy for refugees which is a magnificent response by that government to the problems particularly in eritrea and south sudan. the uk government is working with the ethiopian government to see that refugees in ethiopia can have access to work, up to 30,000 job places. that is something i think we
10:22 am
should absolutely be doing. that has been singled out for praise in this report but you said about potentially looking at what happens to migrants when they are returned to migrants when they are returned to libya, having tried to head off on that journey, it to libya, having tried to head off on thatjourney, it is uk money that is obviously helping the coast guard in libya to intercept these people and take them back, how would you suggest it be looked at and what might change? clearly, where there are things to be improved, they need to be improved, but i do think anyone would suggest working with the libyan coast guard in order to save people's lives, when so many people have drowned on a perilous crossing could be a bad thing. it is surely a good thing. what we then have to look at is what happens to people when they are returned. the work of 0xfam and other ngos are vital and we must listen to them with great respect. to point them out with this particular report and suggest the uk aid is doing real harm isa suggest the uk aid is doing real harm is a complete misinterpretation of the report. there are areas we
10:23 am
have to look at and there are people, let's not forget it is the people, let's not forget it is the people who are actually breaching people's human rights are doing the harm. it is not the uk government or anybody associated with it. we really need to look at those things in detail while recognising that the work the uk government, often on its own. i have been to northern nigeria where the uk government is working in very, very difficult situations. there is almost no deal is working there apart from the uk government. i hear the broader picture of what you're saying about the good work thatis you're saying about the good work that is being done with uk aid. john campbell, the strategy, obviously, in terms of people travelling from libya to europe, making that dangerous journey across the mediterranean is aimed at stopping that happening, because more than 4500 people were killed on matt crossen last year, and jeremy lefroy making the point that if investing
10:24 am
in the coast guard and stopping people making that journey in the coast guard and stopping people making thatjourney is having an effect, it is absolutely the right thing? does the right thing but what the uk and europe are interested in, is preventing migrants reaching europe. the broader issue should be about the security of those migrants. the key issueis security of those migrants. the key issue is being overlooked. what are the factors driving people leaving africa to come to europe. that is where we need to focus. this has not identified any relevant thinking of policies which deal with that. i'm afraid i totally disagree with that. the uk is working with the economic divide and in nigeria and in ethiopia, and that is the thing to enable both ethiopians and nigerians, and refugees seeking refuge in their countries, to see a better future for themselves in their own countries and regions. that is surely very strategic
10:25 am
thinking? john campbell? the government promised last year they would put money into the strategy identified by your speaker. the issueis identified by your speaker. the issue is this already fits into ethiopia in developing strategies. ethiopia in developing strategies. ethiopia polices its borders relatively efficiently. the investment into ethiopian industry is primarily there, as seen by the british government as something which will prevent eritreans leaving the region. eritrea ns which will prevent eritreans leaving the region. eritreans are not leaving searching for work. there are broader agendas and there are commitments made to migration which can be addressed by investment next year or the next two years in jobs in ethiopia. thank you to all of you. a government spokesperson said, "cross—government efforts are tackling the root causes of migration by building opportunity and stability for people in their home regions so they don't need to make the perilous journey across the mediterranean. icai rightly praises our innovative work in ethiopia where we have created 30,000 jobs for refugees. we're also getting help to vulnerable migrants who have already started their treacherous journey. since may 2015, british vessels have
10:26 am
saved more than 13,000 lives in the mediterranean." lots of you getting touch today about the cuts being made to some subjects in schools. we had a particularly strong response to the news that lots of schools stopping design and technology. lots of you took it at school and have made a career out of it. 0ne viewer who contacted us was syreeta challingerfrom lincoln. she did design and technology and art a—levels and is now a fashion designer. shejoins art a—levels and is now a fashion designer. she joins us art a—levels and is now a fashion designer. shejoins us now. you obviously feel very strongly about this. absolutely, iwould obviously feel very strongly about this. absolutely, i would not be employed at all if i had not taken those subjects. what to think about the idea that it may go off the curriculum if it is not viable? i'm
10:27 am
shocked and in disbelief actually. british design is revered around the world. if we cut it at such an early age, at school age, what does that mean forfuture age, at school age, what does that mean for future generations? do you think you would have ultimately found your way without design and technology? these are relatively new subjects in british education.” would have struggled. and i know that my partner who also struggled with dyslexia at school, if he had not had art, design and technology as well, we would not be as employable as we are now. we would not have the skill set we have now. it has moulded us greatly. what was it you got from studying it, the skills you talk about? if you are not good at maths or remembering subjects, if you are a bit more logical and hands—on, it definitely
10:28 am
benefits you at a school age. it shows you that there are other opportunities, rather than having your nose in a book or having to correct spelling or anything in that manner. there are other opportunities. we have talked on the programme about the growth in manufacturing in this country, in the fashion industry, we were talking just before london fashion week about how the fashion industry is benefiting the country, tell us more about your career and your input there? so, iwas more about your career and your input there? so, i was fortunate that i studied, i went on to university to study textile design and that has opened up doors within the industry pretty much straightaway. having worked for uk—based companies, and then even opening an opportunity to work globally. however, most recently, i have been working predominantly with the british high street and everyone in that industry would have studied
10:29 am
artand in that industry would have studied art and design or technology at school. therefore, ithink art and design or technology at school. therefore, i think it is quite short—sighted for the government to not invest in those areas, because it is a huge industry. thank you. it is great to know you were watching at home and you are obviously moved by what he we we re you are obviously moved by what he we were talking about and got in touch. it is great to have you on the programme. thank you. do keep your comments coming in. more and more people are seeing the funny side of people in power and politics in general. we'll find out why some think we're in the golden age of satire. and should you put a cover on your pram or pushchair when you are doing the school run? we will hear more about pollution. annita mcveigh is in the bbc newsroom with a summary of the news.
10:30 am
good morning again. bt has bowed to pressure from telecoms regulator 0fcom to legally separate 0penreach which runs much of the uk's broadband infrastructure. the regulator had been pushing for the move following complaints about poor levels of service and had threatened to force bt to make the change. 0penreach will have to work to the interests of all consumers, better broadband, but secondly, the decisions it takes as a company in terms of investment again have got to work for the interests of the whole country and we would expect to see from this both better service, but also better broadband. labour has accused the government of being in "disarray" after the prime minister said controversial tax rises for self—employed workers would not be put into legislation until the autumn. theresa may said the changes to national insurance, announced in the budget, were necessary and fair but said the chancellor would listen to concerns before mps voted on the measures later this year. mps are being warned the palace
10:31 am
of westminster is close to a "catastrophic failure" unless they make a decision over its renovation plans soon. the public accounts committee, which overlooks government spending, says the longer mps mull over the options, the greater the chance that public money will be wasted. the committee is encouraging parliament to support the cheapest option to repair the deterioration, which will cost around £3.5 billion and mean mps and peers would leave the building for six years. that's a summary of the latest news. join me for bbc newsroom live at 11am. thank you very much. here's some sport now with hugh. good morning. british cycling have admitted to failings in their world class performance programme after a draft version of the independent report into the sport's governing body was leaked overnight. it claims there is a "culture of fear" among staff at british cycling and that an internal british cycling report following jess varnish's claims of sexism against former technical director shane sutton was "sanitised".
10:32 am
manchester united can claim they got a good result on a bad pitch. henrikh mkhitaryan scored the away goal in a 1—1 draw at rostov in the first leg of their europa league last 16 tie. england's cricketers cruise to a series whitewash in the caribbean. they won the third one day international against the west indies comfortably thanks to centuries from adam hales and joe root. wales and ireland launch the penultimate weekend of six nations action tonight. anything other than a victory for ireland will end their bid for a third title in four years and is likely to mean england can claim the championship by beating scotland. that's all the sport for now. lovely, see you later. thank you very much. the host of one of the biggest talk shows in america said yesterday "when i see donald trump, i see a stand—up comedian"
10:33 am
and it would seem he's not the only one seeing the funny side of him and politics in general. because there's growing interest in taking the mick out of people in power and some think we're in the golden age of satire. james ballardie's been looking into this one for us. you might not think so every time you turn on the news, but some people think we're currently living through one of the funniest periods of human history. it's boomtime for satire, the art of poking fun at public figures. satirists have never been more popular. in the uk, sales of satirical magazine private eye are a record all—time high of 25% on just five years ago. private eye has been taunting politicians with razor—sharp barbs since 1961. its editor ian hislop is often described as the most sued man in britain. it doesn't measure knowledge. it measures basic intelligence, which he would lose. meanwhile, in the usa,
10:34 am
there are no less than 24 nightly talk shows to guide satire fans through the day's top stories. and long—running comedy sketch show saturday night live is experiencing its highest audience ratings in 24 years, up 26% on 2016, in part thanks to hollywood actor alec baldwin's impression of president donald trump. what is that picture doing in here? oh, no. no, that'sjust a plate of mashed potatoes, sir. it even caught the attention of the president himself. not everyone is a fan of satire, but it's everywhere. it's in our streets... and its online. satirists are lapping up shares and retweets. last month, this skit starring comedian melissa mccarthy as white house press secretary sean spicer became an internet sensation, racking up over 24 million youtube hits. and it's not just professional satirists
10:35 am
who are enjoying a purple patch. you might recognise some of these pictures from your facebook or twitter news feed. they're called memes, the tool of choice for budding amateur political humourists. but why do we relish ridiculing people in power? can satire really change opinions, or does itjust reinforce what we think we already know? and by lampooning those we disagree with, do we risk empowering them instead? i've come to private eye's hq in london to find out why politics is suddenly so funny. why is private eye selling so many copies right now? i think, if i'm honest, it's because of brexit and trump. people have become more interested in politics and also quite gloomy about it, and private eye offers some jokes, some light relief,
10:36 am
and hopefully some insight, though i'm less confident about that. as a satirist you have a responsibility in some way, do you ever worry people might start taking you literally? well, i mean that obviously has been a problem. private eye was listed as fake news by some american academic who just didn't get any of the jokes and decided that when we said the queen had signed a petition to stop trump coming over, she actually had. so that is a slight problem in doing satire, but responsibility? yes, i mean, you should be able to justify what you write. what is the difference between private eye and fake news? obviously the journalism in private eye is true and the jokes are funny. fake news is when you deliberately make up stories in order to influence events. it's a group of teenagers in a shed in macedonia or the middle of russia, when you are deliberately making up news in order to make people believe things which aren't true. when a character like trump comes
10:37 am
along, do you think, "0h, goody, i've got lots and lots ofjokes that i can tell," or are you terrified? you know, my first reaction is as a responsible citizen and human being, so i'm appalled and i'm terrified. and my second response is how very lucky we are that trump is going to provide most of the jokes for the foreseeable future. and this is a wall full of my... a wall of fame! yeah, all my favourite covers. you can feel the acerbic wit just radiating from these covers. talk me through which is your favourite? we talked about american presidents, i love that, "bush, the countdown to war." but, again, the great thing about doing it for a long time is you realise that there isn't
10:38 am
that much that's new, and the approach tends to need to be the same. satire's pretty consistent, i think, not only over the decades but pretty much over the centuries. i mean, what happens is it goes in and out of fashion, sometimes everyone says, "0h, satire, marvellous, we must have more of it!" and then during the down periods they say, "oh, really, it's so pathetic, we don't want this stuff, it doesn't help." do you think that by going after all these people, so many years, that you may have contributed in some way to the climate of mistrust around politics? no, what i hope we've done is make people view it realistically. i think people do tend to say that, they say, "well, it's your fault for pointing out when people have done something wrong because then we think they are up to something wrong." and i say, no, ourjob is to make people honest, to make people think if they do that then they will be found out. satire helps us make sense of the world.
10:39 am
it empowers us and reminds us that humour can be found in even the most distressing situation. it was on january 7th 2015 that terrorist attacks on french satirical magazine charlie hebdo brought home the power and the danger of satire. 12 people were killed and 11 injured when masked gunmen stormed its offices in paris. in an outcry of public grief, 3.7 million peoplejoined demonstrations across france. one week after the attack, surviving charlie hebdo staff released a commemorative edition packed full of incendiaryjokes and cartoons mocking their attackers. shappi khorsandi is someone who knows this all too well. her father was a satirist in iran, until he and the rest of the family were forced to flee in 1976 after he published a poem ridiculing the revolutionary government.
10:40 am
hello, apollo! in countries in the middle east, iran, after the revolution they went gunning for the satirists, they were the first on the hit list. and your dad was one of those people, that's how you ended up here? yeah! my dad's the man! so i came to britain in the early 80s. we were refugees long before it became fashionable. a lot of your stuff is based on real life, isn't it? you're taking things that happen to you day—to—day and you're talking about them in that wider context? there are certain times when certain things are going on in politics, like they've closed the refugee camp in calais. now, i was a refugee child, so how can i not mention that in stand—up when what i do is so personal? for me, i find satire itself is to mock the status quo, mock the powers that be,
10:41 am
mocking what we are told to consider is right and normal and the moral high ground. and you're like, "no, no, no, that's not the way i see it. you're actually trying to trick us, you're trying to lead us by the nose, we're not having that." that's a very powerful thing. the western world is currently experiencing the most significant political upheaval since the second world war. in times of turmoil, satirists see opportunities. like geoff norcott — he's targeting remain voters in light of last year's eu referendum. one thing about remainers, right, is they don't realise some of their arguments were oddly racist themselves. "well, who's going to come and do all the menialjobs?" is that how you see the eu, supplying you with economic 0ompa—loompas? are you aiming to convert people, are you aiming to reinforce what people think they already know?
10:42 am
convert people? i'd like to think i had that sort of power, i could just reach out my hand and we'd all walk away thinking the same thing. but i think in a way it's about sharing ideas and also unpicking some of the tension around brexit, because obviously i was a leave voter and the stereotype of a working—class leave voter is perhaps a bit ignorant, uneducated, possibly racist, we all took one bite on a straight banana and just started setting fire to croissants or whatever it was. i know those people exist but i don't honestly think that was the broad sweep of the working—class leave vote, and i think in a way, hopefully, if you hear somebody talk who's reasonably informed on the subject it might make people think, well, maybe other working—class leave voters felt that way. voting conservative is a bit like buying a james blunt album, isn't it? you know for a fact millions of other people must have done it, but weirdly you never meet one. that's weird, isn't it? trump and brexit are the gift that keeps on giving. i do think that's exhaustable, though. i do think there'll come a point with the public where, as things probably settle down a little bit, that seems a bold
10:43 am
prediction with trump, it might be we return to something resembling a bit more normality. we'll actually be begging for a minister to go with a call girl, orjust something that's a bit more the kind of thing we were used to. so are you just carving yourself a comedy niche, then? wouldn't it be easier if you just didn't make jokes about politics at all? yeah, i was definitely carving a niche. other kinds of humour, left—wing humour, in a way i admire people doing that kind of comedy because it's a far more crowded marketplace at the moment. people on twitter, facebook, all the comedy panel shows, most of the humour comes from that angle so it's almost harder, i think, to make an original joke in that respect, which ultimately i'm only centre—right, really, which is like a lot of the country, but i guess in the context of comedy that seems radical. these pictures are the latest weapon in satire's battle of ideas — internet memes. since the birth of social media there's been an explosion in memes,
10:44 am
cartoons, drawings and photos made by regular people who've got something funny to say about the world we live in. the very best might get reposted by tens of millions of people, but despite their popularity many meme makers remain secretive about their work. i persuaded one of them to speak to me. his name'sjim'll paint it, and he's agreed to be interviewed on the condition that we don't show his face. jim, who are you, what do you do? my name'sjim, i run jim'll paint it, which is an online thing, facebook, twitter, tumblr, that sort of stuff. people send me their requests and i do my best to sort bring their ideas to life. you've asked to be represented by one of your very, very cool drawings. why do you think that people who make memes, people who make satirical stuff on the internet, are less keen on showing themselves? i think maybe it makes them less afraid to say
10:45 am
what they want to say, maybe, without repercussions. 0bviously that can have a negative effect us because it means you just get trolls and all kinds of unsavoury characters that can just masquerade behind anonymity. memes, as you say, or things that are on the internet, they are a form of propaganda, in a way, but instead of coming from the government it's sort of self—perpetuating propaganda, it's made by people and its spread by people, and i think that's where the strength of memes is, is that it's not something that is sort of broadcast to you, it's something that you pass on. they spread so much quicker than any other form of satire could. there's a lot of turmoil politically, does that mean the submissions that you're getting are different? something started as a stupid little joke. all of my stuffs the stuff is
10:46 am
user generated. someone put in a request. . jim'll paint it started just as a stupid littlejoke, ijust wanted to do some funny pictures. all of my stuff is user—generated, so whatever people are talking about they send to me, and it influences their ideas, it influences their requests. there was absolutely no politics for the first maybe one or two years, it was just celebrities and pop culture references. i think it's massively changed, and i think people do talk about politics more than they do celebrity gossip and pop culture. that's become water cooler entertainment. do you think drawing your pictures helps you deal with these things? yeah, it's therapeutic, total therapy. the one i got the most likes for was drawing a picture of donald trump on the toilet on his first day in office, and it was just my way of basically just trying to get through that day when the news came in. things are ridiculous, things are easily mockable, probably more so than they've ever
10:47 am
been, but that is people's way of dealing with it, theyjust want to sort of channel it into something that they can laugh at. sometimes we could all do with a little more satire in our lives. when news headlines go bonkers, perhaps laughter might be the best medicine after all. so long as there are people in charge, so long as there are haves and have nots, there will always be jokes to tell about the way of the world. satire is as old as time itself, and in 2017 it's more potent than ever. keeping an eye on the people in charge can only be good for democracy. a world without satire would be no laughing matter. if you want to see that again, it is on the programme page. parents are being urged to cover prams and pushchairs during the school run to protect their babies from air pollution. that's according to researchers at the university of surrey who say that particles from exhaust fumes are particularly high at bus stops and traffic lights. it is an issue that mums on the school run this morning said they are very aware of. school run this morning said they are very aware of. i did think about ita are very aware of. i did think about it a lot but there is not much we do as we live in central london so
10:48 am
there is pollution everywhere. they have but had any chest problems. i thought if they did have problems we might have to move because we live on euston road. there is a lot of pollution and i think it is because of the construction, the cars and everything going on. have you ever thought about putting the roof up because of pollution? sometimes i put the raincoat on the pushchair just for her to avoid getting the, how would you say, the fumes of the cars, so yes. say mums on the school run. the research was lead by dr prashant kumar, who happens to be in the indian capital, delhi, and he told me what the study found. we were trying to assess a typical route when parents are carrying their babies, they pass through a different part of the road so it might include the traffic intersections, a road section where you have the traffic flow
10:49 am
which is continuous as well as the bus lanes. so what we found is first of all that during the morning hours you get higher exposure to the fine and very fine particles as compared to the afternoon. and interestingly, in the afternoon you get higher exposure to the bigger particles as compared to the morning hours. this was quite interesting because it seems to be the fact of the dew during the night when the suspension of these particles is less during the morning, and in the afternoon hours you might see the influence and that could have increased representations. so how dangerous is that environment for a baby? how much risk does it pose to a baby? so i always say that our body
10:50 am
is a good doctor, so it can deal with a certain level but for infants, their body is not yet developed, so if they are inhaling a similar sort of concentrations to adults are inhaling, they might have actually worse in fact. and when we looked into the chemical composure of the particles, there were traces of aluminium and components which look like they're coming from the tyre wheel or the abrasion or the abrasion from the brakes. this is not very good. what could the adverse effects be of all of that? there are a number of studies. we looked into the toxicology side of these particles which is an important area and i think the results should focus on that. but the studies in the past, they have sold that, if you have the exposure to these
10:51 am
particles, they could lead to the cardiovascular as well as respiratory diseases in children. right now i am sitting in delhi and this is one of the worst places when it comes to pollution and statistics show that one in three children has got actually some sort of asthmatic problem because of inhaling the pollution. why are the toxic particles so concentrated in a pram? because what happens is normally in the pram, the emissions reduce as you go up. so the prams are at a much lower height and this is pretty close to the height of the tailpipe as well. it is where the emissions are coming and the babies are basically sitting almost at the same height. see might expect a higher concentration of those heights compared with the height of an adult person. that was doctor prashant kumar who
10:52 am
carried out the research. we can talk to senia dedic, a mother in battersea who is so concerned about the effects of pollution she has set up the effects of pollution she has set upa campaign the effects of pollution she has set up a campaign group and we have also beenjoined by anna up a campaign group and we have also been joined by anna jones from greenpeace who also is a mother. senia, tell us why you are concerned and you set up a group? pollution in battersea is so high because of this particular tunnel which all of north battersea has to go through to get to the south battersea to the shopping area. priorfive primary schools and care homes are involved which have to use the tunnel. and some research was conducted which found that there is a higher pollution in the whole battersea in that tunnel which everybody using an
10:53 am
foot, in addition to 79 is the buses which go through the tunnel and 89 role i, from 18 platforms above the tunnel which are part of clapham junction station. i know you have been campaigning to try to address that issue. in terms of practicality is, what are people doing as they go through the tunnel? the advice today's children in prams at school rush hour should be covered over. is that correct? i'm not surprised at all. everyone covered their faces with skulls in winter. in summer we are coughing. —— with scarves. people are trying to take the children to devon, dartmoor or dorset in the summer for the summer holidays. i know it is a short while but it really helps, especially with clea n but it really helps, especially with clean airand but it really helps, especially with clean air and organic food and children really do notice it when they come back and they have to go
10:54 am
through the tunnel at clapham junction. anna jones, you are from greenpeace and you are a mum as well, what is your perspective? we have to get to the root cause of this which is primarily diesel vehicles. we now have alternatives available. we need to make the transition away from old polluting vehicles and towards cleaner alternatives if we are going to get to grips with this. putting a pram cover on might help a little bit today but those children are being exposed every day and children coming after them and we need to get to the root problem and shift the pollution completely away from our streets. why haven't we talked much about pollution in recent years?” think we have but the scientific studies are coming thick and fast now. more and more people are looking into this, more and more people are becoming aware of what was previously invisible. the more we talk about it the more we realise
10:55 am
it is affecting us. the study 's today show what kind of impact it is having, there is more about the diseases that the children might grow up to experience. things like lung cancer, respiratory and heart diseases. i think finally we are talking about it but what we need is proper action to deal with the problem. you mentioned action on diesel cars, what else would you like to see? we are looking forward to the government's new plan and we hope that will phase out diesel vehicles from our cities. we will put in strong clean air zones to make sure the polluting vehicles are not entering areas which are really bad. i think we should look at measures like they have in paris where an high pollution days they restrict hammy vehicles are allowed in. —— how many vehicles are allowed in. we have to get to grips with the industry which are continuing to produce vehicles which are producing
10:56 am
up produce vehicles which are producing up to 15 times more pollution than they should be. the bw scandal showed us one company which is cheating the system but what we have learned since then is all vehicle manufacturers learned since then is all vehicle manufacture rs are learned since then is all vehicle manufacturers are producing vehicles which produce up to 15 times as much produce and —— pollution as they should be. senia, what would you like to see to address this?” should be. senia, what would you like to see to address this? i would like to see to address this? i would like to see a electric buses in all of london and possibly solar only car parks where the electric cars and electric buses as well could be charged everywhere in london. we have quite a few shopping zones around here as well and big supermarkets who could have warnings above their car parks with solar powered electric chargers for a electric cars. and it is obviously being discussed, you said there was a strategy forthcoming, do you expect there to be policy change?”
10:57 am
think there will have to be. the government has been taken to court twice now and has been told to go and do its homework. we have to keep things to account and we will have to make some tough decisions. this is about a generation of children and those coming after who will be growing up to experience really serious health impacts. that has a big impact on our nhs. the government's on estimate is air pollution is costing us over £27 billion a year. thank you both very much. i want to just bring you a couple more comments on school subjects being ta ken couple more comments on school subjects being taken of the syllabus because of budget cuts. louisa has e—mailed and said we need to see schools as providing employees of the future. why deny them the choice where they will switch off. we need all skills, notjust where they will switch off. we need allskills, notjust academic. teachers need to be seen as professionals and allowed to do
10:58 am
theirjob professionals and allowed to do their job without professionals and allowed to do theirjob without meddling. and, it was also made about payment for after—school clubs, the clubs are used often as a childcare options so they should be paid for by the parents. thank you for your comments on that and your company today. i will see you soon. have a lovely weekend. goodbye. morning. what a difference a day makes, particularly without the sunshine. we are not completely without sunshine but for the majority of people today we are seeing scenes like this one sent in by our weather watcher. we have some channel island fog across the welsh coast. in the north east of wales and the north cornwall coast we will see the best of the sunshine right now. it is still mild. across scotla nd
10:59 am
now. it is still mild. across scotland there is patchy rain here. more rain comes in through the evening and overnight. with all the cloud and rain, it is not going to bea cloud and rain, it is not going to be a cold night. temperatures barely dropped. and they will barely rise under the cloud is on tomorrow. northern ireland and scotland look set to have a much drier and brighter day. if we see some sunshine in the south east we could see a pleasant 16 or 17. sunday looks like the more complicated day of the weekend. there is more likely to be some rain. there will be some bright spells as well. this is bbc news and these are the top stories developing at 11am:
11:00 am
head teachers in england say a funding crisis is forcing them to increase class sizes and cut courses. british telecom agrees to turn its broadband operation 0penreach into a separate company following pressure from the telecoms regulator 0fcom. 0penreach will have to work to the interests of all consumers, better broadband, but secondly the decisions it takes for the company in terms of investments again have to work for the interests all country. a leading brexit negotiator raises hopes over eu citizenship rights as european leaders meet for the last eu summit before the divorce negotiations are expected to begin.

40 Views

1 Favorite

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on